Tags:Battered women

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Preventing and addressing intimate partner violence against migrant and ethnic minority women: the role of the health sector.

Preventing and addressing intimate partner violence against migrant and ethnic minority women: the role of the health sector. Violence against women is an extreme manifestation of gender inequality in society and a serious violation of fundamental human rights. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is the most common type of such violence and takes place within couples. IPV can lead to death, physical injury, functional impairment, mental health problems, negative health behaviour, chronic conditions and reproductive health problems. Institutional discrimination, lack of access to or knowledge of services, and cultural differences can prevent women who are not only experiencing IPV but also migrants or members of ethnic minorities from seeking help. This policy brief aims to provide input into the role of the health sector in preventing and addressing IPV among migrant women and those of ethnic minorities. It describes the scope of the problem, presenting key evidence, and makes recommendations for health policy and health systems, health facilities and health service providers.

Categoría:Género
TipoComunicaciones/Informes/Artículos (colecciones)
Publicado en ODS2015-02-25

Factors Associated With Women’s Reporting of Intimate Partner Violence in Spain

In Spain, in 2013, the 20% of women who were murdered by their partner had reported him previously. We analyze the 2011 Spanish-Macrosurvey on Gender Violence to identify and analyze the prevalence of and the principal factors associated with reporting a situation of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the main reasons women cite for not filing such reports, or for subsequently deciding to withdraw their complaint. Overall, 72.8% of women exposed to IPV did not report their aggressor. The most frequent reasons for not reporting were not giving importance to the situation (33.9%), and fear and lack of trust in the reporting process (21.3%). The main reasons for withdrawing the complaint were cessation of the violence (20.0%), and fear and threats (18.2%). The probability of reporting increased among women with young children who were abused, prevalence ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]): 2.14 [1.54, 2.98], and those whose mother was abused, prevalence ratio (95% CI): 2.25 [1.42, 3.57]. Always focusing on the need to protect women who report abuse, it is necessary to promote the availability of and access to legal resources especially among women who use them less: women who do not have children and women who do not have previous family exposure to violence.

Categoría:Género
TipoComunicaciones/Informes/Artículos (individual)
Publicado en ODS2016-02-17